Friday, May 29, 2015

Doing Nothing and Nothing to Do: The Hidden Value of Empty Time and Boredom

KETS DE VRIES Manfred F. R.
Access the publisher's website
Organizational Dynamics (forthcoming)

In this article, I suggest that doing nothing and being bored can be invaluable to the creative process. In our present networked society, introspection and reflection have become lost arts. Instead, we are at risk of becoming victims of informational overload. The balance between activity and inactivity has become seriously out of sync. However, doing nothing is a great way to induce states of mind that nurture our imagination. Slacking off may be the best thing we can do for our mental health. Seemingly inactive states of mind can be an incubation period for future bursts of creativity. Keeping busy can be a very effective defense mechanism for warding off disturbing thoughts and feelings. But by resorting to manic-like behavior we suppress the truth of our feelings and concerns, consciously or unconsciously avoiding periods of uninterrupted, freely associative thoughts. Yet unconscious thought processes can generate novel ideas and solutions more effectively than a conscious focus on problem solving. I end by recommending some actions and conditions that can help achieve this state of mind.