Friday, March 27, 2015

Justice among those at the Top: Power, Status, and Dishonest Behavior

BLADER S., YAP Andy J.
Justice among those at the Top: Power, Status, and Dishonest Behavior  in Corruption and Concealment: The Roots of Dishonest Behavior, J. W. van Prooijen, P. van Lang (Eds.), Cambridge University Press (forthcoming)

The Ergonomics of Ethics

YAP Andy J.
The Ergonomics of Ethics in Cheating in Corruption and Concealment: The Roots of Dishonest Behavior, J. W. van Prooijen, P. van Lang (Eds.), Cambridge University Press (forthcoming)

The Biology of Bargaining: Dynamic Hormone Changes During Negotiation Predict Economic Profit

MEHTA P., MOR S., YAP Andy J., PRASAD S.
The Biology of Bargaining: Dynamic Hormone Changes During Negotiation Predict Economic Profit Psychological Science (forthcoming)

Leadership, Innovation, and Strategic Change A Conversation With Michael Tushman

SEONG Sorah, KIM Yeongsu, SZULANSKI Gabriel
Access the publisher's website
Journal of Management Inquiry (forthcoming)

Continuing the emerging tradition of the Knowledge and Innovation (K&I) Interest Group at the Strategic Management Society (SMS) Conference to interview foundational scholars in strategic management, we invited Professor Michael Tushman from Harvard Business School (HBS) as our guest of honor this year. The interview provided a rare opportunity to get behind the scenes of the author’s much celebrated scholarly contribution to the field as well as his responses to some of the new findings within and across his work over time. 


Thursday, March 26, 2015

Ready to be Open? Explaining the Firm-Level Barriers to Benefiting from Openness to External Knowledge

MONTEIRO L. Felipe, MOL Michael J., BIRKINSHAW Julian
Read the working paper
INSEAD Working Paper 2015/24/STR revised version of 2013/48/ST

This paper provides new theory and evidence about the benefits of openness on a firm’s innovation performance and, more importantly, the specific firm-level contingencies under which those benefits are more (or less) likely to be observed. Building on Dyer and Singh’s (1998) relational view, we suggest that a firm’s lack of resources and absorptive capacity, as well as its use of secrecy, are significant barriers to benefiting from openness to external knowledge. Using responses from 12,152 firms to the fourth and fifth UK versions of the Community Innovation Survey (CIS) we generate findings consistent with our hypotheses.