Tuesday, November 29, 2011

FANG Lily, QIAN Jun "QJ", ZHANG Huiping
Out of the Limelight but in Play: Trading and Liquidity of Media and Off-Media Stocks
INSEAD Working Paper 2011/124/FIN

Using a novel, hand-collected dataset of a popular financial TV show and intra-day trading data from China, we compare the trading, liquidity, and returns of on-the-show and off-theshow stocks from the same industry. Employing a difference-in-difference approach, we find that offshow stocks experience significantly greater improvements in liquidity with higher trading volume and lower bid-ask spreads after the show. These improvements are mostly attributed to small trades. Both on-show and off-show stocks experience positive abnormal returns that do not reverse one month after the show, and the return gap between these stocks before the show disappears. There is some evidence that small traders profit more from buying off-show stocks than on-show stocks after the show. Overall, our evidence suggests that media coverage facilitates price discovery, and retail investors, as a group, behave rationally and are not as naïve as typically thought in their reaction to news from mass media.

Friday, November 25, 2011

FANG Lily, HUANG Sterling
Gender and Connections among Wall Street Analysts
INSEAD Working Paper 2011/122/FIN

We study the interplay between gender and connections among Wall Street analysts. We measure connection using the Cohen, Frazzini, and Malloy school ties between analysts and the firms they cover. Male and female analysts are equally connected with companies they cover. Connection is associated with more accurate earnings forecasts and more impactful stock recommendations for men, but not for women. Connection significantly improves men’s career outcomes such as promotions, but not women’s. For women, Ivy-League education and accurate forecasts are rewarded. Our results are consistent with the notion in sociology that men reap higher returns from social capital than women.
KETS de VRIES Manfred F. R., FLORENT-TREACY Elizabeth, KOROTOV Konstantin
Psychodynamic Issues in Organizational Leadership in Wiley-Blackwell Handbook of Psychology of Organizational Development and Leadership Wiley, (2013)



The vicissitudes of leadership At its heart, leadership is about human behavior—understanding it and enhancing it. Leadership involves the highly complex interplay among individuals in systems, all within diverse situational contexts. It is about the way people and organizations behave, about creating and strengthening relationships, handling conflict, building commitment, establishing a group identity, and adapting behavior to increase effectiveness (Burns, 1978; Bennis & Nanus, 1985; Stogdill & Bass, 1990; Pfeffer 1998; Kets de Vries, 2001c). Effective leaders are receptive to the needs of followers; they are cognizant of the sensitive nature of the leader-follower relationship; they pay careful attention to group processes. Such leaders know how to calm anxieties and arouse hopes and aspirations; they know how to transform personal needs into societal demands; they know how to liberate human energy and inspire people to positive action. They are able to transcend narrow, personal concerns—their own and their followers. These leaders seek to create great places to work, and they are the people we need in our rapidly changing world.
KETS de VRIES Manfred F. R., FLORENT-TREACY Elizabeth, KOROTOV Konstantin
Psychodynamic Issues in Organizational Leadership
INSEAD Working Paper 2011/121/EFE

The vicissitudes of leadership At its heart, leadership is about human behavior—understanding it and enhancing it. Leadership involves the highly complex interplay among individuals in systems, all within diverse situational contexts. It is about the way people and organizations behave, about creating and strengthening relationships, handling conflict, building commitment, establishing a group identity, and adapting behavior to increase effectiveness (Burns, 1978; Bennis & Nanus, 1985; Stogdill & Bass, 1990; Pfeffer 1998; Kets de Vries, 2001c). Effective leaders are receptive to the needs of followers; they are cognizant of the sensitive nature of the leader-follower relationship; they pay careful attention to group processes. Such leaders know how to calm anxieties and arouse hopes and aspirations; they know how to transform personal needs into societal demands; they know how to liberate human energy and inspire people to positive action. They are able to transcend narrow, personal concerns—their own and their followers. These leaders seek to create great places to work, and they are the people we need in our rapidly changing world.

Wednesday, November 23, 2011

ZEMSKY Peter, GONCALO Pacheco de Almeida
Some Like It Free: Innovators Strategic Use of Disclosure to Slow Down Competition, Strategic Management Journal Forthcoming

Why do some innovators freely reveal their intellectual property? This empirical puzzle has been a focal point of debate in the R&D literature. We show that innovators may share proprietary technology with rivals for free—even if it does not directly benefit them—to slow down competition. By disclosing IP, innovators indirectly induce rivals to wait and imitate instead of concurrently investing in innovation, which alleviates competitive pressure. In contrast with the classical strategy view, our paper also shows that imitators may not always benefit from interfirm knowledge spillovers. Specifically, imitators may want to limit the know-how that they can freely appropriate from innovators. Otherwise, innovators have fewer incentives to quickly develop new technologies, which, ultimately, reduces the pace and profits of imitation.

Tuesday, November 22, 2011

GREVE Henrich, MITSUHASHI Hitoshi, BAUM Joel A. C.
Greener Pastures: Outside Options and Strategic Alliance Withdrawal
INSEAD Working Paper 2011/120/EFE

Departing from prior work that demonstrates the stickiness and stability of alliance networks resulting from embeddedness, we extend matching theory to study firms’ withdrawal from alliances. Viewing alliance withdrawal as a result of firms’ pursuit of more promising alternative partners – outside options – rather than failures in collaboration, we predict that a firm is more likely to withdraw from an alliance when there is a higher density of outside options that have better match quality than the current partners. We also propose that, because matching is two-sided, outside options have a greater impact on a firm’s withdrawal when they are more likely to initiate new alliances. Using data on alliances in the global liner shipping industry, we show that, controlling for internal tensions in the alliance, outside options predict alliance withdrawals. Thus, despite the alliance stickiness and stability, firms alter their alliances in response to the availability of promising outside options, even leaving alliances that appear successful.
BAUM Joel, GREVE Henrich
Young and Growing Research Directions in Competitive Strategy in Handbook of Research in Strategy Giovanni Battista Dagnino (Eds.) Edward Elgar (2012)
GREVE Henrich, MITSUHASHI Hitoshi, BAUM Joel A. C.
Greener Pastures: Outside Options and Strategic Alliance Withdrawal Organization Science 24, 1 (2013) 79-98

Departing from prior work that demonstrates the stickiness and stability of alliance networks resulting from embeddedness, we extend matching theory to study firms’ withdrawal from alliances. Viewing alliance withdrawal as a result of firms’ pursuit of more promising alternative partners – outside options – rather than failures in collaboration, we predict that a firm is more likely to withdraw from an alliance when there is a higher density of outside options that have better match quality than the current partners. We also propose that, because matching is two-sided, outside options have a greater impact on a firm’s withdrawal when they are more likely to initiate new alliances. Using data on alliances in the global liner shipping industry, we show that, controlling for internal tensions in the alliance, outside options predict alliance withdrawals. Thus, despite the alliance stickiness and stability, firms alter their alliances in response to the availability of promising outside options, even leaving alliances that appear successful.
GONG Yeming, YUCESAN Enver
Stochastic Optimization for Transshipment Problems with Positive Replenishment Lead Times, International Journal of Production Economics 135, 1 (2012) 61-72
 
Transshipments, monitored movements of material at the same echelon of a supply chain, represent an effective pooling mechanism. Earlier papers dealing with transshipments either do not incorporate replenishment lead times into their analysis, or only provide a heuristic algorithm where optimality cannot be guaranteed beyond settings with two locations. This paper uses infinitesimal perturbation analysis by combining with a stochastic approximation method to examine the multi-location transshipment problem with positive replenishment lead times. It demonstrates the computation of optimal base stock quantities through sample path optimization. From a methodological perspective, this paper deploys a duality-based gradient computation method to improve computational efficiency. From an application perspective, it solves transshipment problems with non-negligible replenishment lead times. A numerical study illustrates the performance of the proposed approach.

Monday, November 21, 2011

SOSA Manuel, GARGIULO Martin, ROWLES Craig
Informal Communication Networks and the Attention to Technical Interfaces in Complex Product Development
INSEAD Working Paper 2011/119/TOM/OB revised version of 2010/91/TOM/OB

The development of complex products poses substantial operational and organizational challenges to established firms. Previous research has shown that coordinating technical interfaces is vital for the successful development of complex products. Despite the presence of formal organizational structure mechanisms designed to facilitate the attendance to interfaces, informal cross-team communications is one of the most widely used coordination mechanisms during the development of complex systems. We study how the structure of such cross-team communication networks relates to the teams’ ability to coordinate their technical interfaces. We show that an effective examination of the role of social networks requires that we recognize the dual role played by teams when coordinating their technical interfaces with other teams: each directional technical interface has an acquirer and provider of technical information during the design process. We examine how the presence of common third-party teams (i.e., communication partners common to both the acquirer and the provider) influences not only the motivation of acquirer teams to seek interface-related information but also the likelihood of provider teams responding to interface-related requests. We test our hypotheses by examining the network of components of a large commercial aircraft engine and the technical communication network structure of the organization that designs it. We find that the probability of attending to a technical interface decreases when the acquirer team can obtain information about that interface from communication partners it shares with the provider team, whereas such probability increases when the provider team shares many communication partners with the acquirer team and the interface is a critical one.

Friday, November 18, 2011

BENNEDSEN Morten, SCHULTZ Christian
Arm's Length Delegation of Public Services Journal of Public Economics 95, 7-8 (2011) 543-552

Delegation is a key feature of political decision making: Mayors or prime ministers delegate to subordinates, voters delegate to elected representatives. We analyze the effect of political delegation on public service provision and the choice between private or public providers when contracts are incomplete and incentives therefore distorted. We identify two important effects: The incentive effect increases the incentive part of service providers' remuneration and delegation may therefore be a substitute for an explicit complete incentive contract. The bargaining effect improves the bargaining position vis a vis a private firm with market power. In general, these effects imply that delegation improves public service provision.

Thursday, November 17, 2011

BALASUBRAMANIAN Sridhar, BHATTACHARYA Shantanu, KRISHNAN Viswanathan
Pricing Information Goods: A Strategic Analysis of the Selling and Pay-per-use Mechanisms
INSEAD Working Paper 2011/118/TOM

We analyze two pricing mechanisms for information goods { selling, where an up-front payment allows unrestricted use by the consumer, and pay per-use pricing where the payments are tailored to the consumer's usage patterns. We analytically model these pricing mechanisms in a market where consumers differ in terms of usage frequency and utility-per-use. When a monopolist employs each mechanism independently, we demonstrate that pay-per-use pricing generally yields higher profits than selling, provided the transaction cost associated with the former is not too high. We then show that pay-per-use yields higher profits than selling when usage frequency is uncertain, whereas selling yields higher profits when utility-per-use is uncertain. We then analyze a duopoly and demonstrate that, in the only non-zero pricing equilibrium, one duopolist employs selling and the other employs pay-per-use. Here, the findings from the monopoly case are reversed and selling always yields higher profits than pay-per-use. Further, we demonstrate that as the transaction cost associated with pay-per-use increases, the profits of both duopolists can increase. If an upgrade is to be offered later, we show that if consumers are myopic, the pay-per-use mechanism performs better in a monopoly, and selling performs better in a duopoly. Finally, we model the scenario where competing, vertically differentiated firms can choose endogenously between the two pricing mechanisms and demonstrate how the firms move from each offering both mechanisms when the transaction cost associated with pay-per-use is low to each offering only selling when this cost is very high.

Wednesday, November 16, 2011

HUY Quy, JARRETT Michael, DUKE Lisa
Managing Public Opinion in a Crisis: BP CEO Tony Hayward - Abridged Version

© 2011 INSEAD Case Study

BP CEO Tony Hayward (UK) faced intense public scrutiny from many different constituencies in the US in the wake of the oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico. The case focuses on how his words and actions were perceived by the US media and government, and how these perceptions had critical business and personal outcomes.  

Pedagogical Objectives: Corporate leaders face the mounting challenge of having to inspire and motivate employees to achieve their business objectives, as well as external constituencies who do not perform economic transactions with the company, but can significantly influence its economic performance and leaders' legitimacy. The way in which Hayward's words and actions were perceived by these non-market constituencies, the outcome, and the conclusions to be drawn about managing such perceptions in a crisis bring into focus issues such as national politics, collective emotions, impression and symbolic management that many leaders fail to heed when managing a business.

HUY Quy, JARRETT Michael, DUKE Lisa
How IKEA's Strategy Was Formed
© 2011 INSEAD Case Study

This case describes how IKEA's distinctive strategy was formed over a period of about 30 years (late 1940s to late 1970s). It describes how the various elements of its strategy were created gradually, with the help of many people other than the founder Kamprad, and how these elements were ultimately integrated with each other thanks to the creation of IKEA's organizational culture that came much later.
Pedagogical Objectives: The case illustrates a process view of strategy creation. Many students of strategy think that an integrated and effective strategy is the outcome of some systematic, highly analytical process performed centrally by a group of strategic planners. In fact, this case shows how it can emerge from a series of creative small steps by frontline managers, overcoming constraints one by one, over 30 years in a highly competitive industry. Despite the competitive environment, creative strategies continue to emerge through persistent attempts to circumvent existing barriers.



VEROL Marcus, CAMPOS FILHO Luiz Alberto, CASANOVA Lourdes
Marcopolo: The Making of a Global Latina
© 2011 INSEAD Case Study

This case analyzes the internationalization process of Marcopolo, the leading manufacturer of buses in Brazil, tracking the company's international development and its approach to global growth. In the process it signs various strategic alliances with local partners in the different countries it tries to enter. After a few setbacks, some due to the global financial crisis, the company questions if the process was the correct one and what to do next.
Pedagogical Objectives: The case provides a unique perspective on the following issues: 1) Evaluation of an internationalization strategy with a focus on the automotive industry, in particular bus manufacturing. 2) Marcopolo's model for building a global company. 3) How to survive and expand internationally in a crisis setting. 4) Analysis of the bus industry in Brazil and Latin America.
MACHADO André, CAMPOS FILHO Luiz Alberto, CASANOVA Lourdes
Poland Quimica: David Among International Goliaths
© 2011 INSEAD Case Study


This case analyzes the internationalization of Poland Química, a Brazilian medium-size supplier to the oil industry which competes with the big multinationals in the sector. It analyzes Poland's international development and its approach to global growth. In the process the company tries to move away from relying on a single customer, Petrobras. After a series of setbacks to its internationalization strategy, the company questions whether the process was worth it and what to do next.
Pedagogical Objectives: The case provides a unique perspective on the following issues: 1) Evaluation of an internationalization strategy with a focus on the oil industry. 2) Poland Quimica's model for building a global company. 3) Analysis of the oil industry in Brazil and Latin America.

Tuesday, November 15, 2011

GREVE Henrich
Market Niche Entry Decisions: Competition, Learning, and Strategy in Tokyo Banking, 1894-1936 in The Competitive Dynamics of Entrepreneurial Market Entry Gideon D. Markman, Philip H. Phan (Eds.) Edward Elgar (2011) 286-324
GREVE Henrich
Market Niche Entry Decisions: A Retrospective Introduction in The Competitive Dynamics of Entrepreneurial Market Entry Gideon D. Markman, Philip H. Phan (Eds.) Edward Elgar (2011)


HUANG Li; GUNIA Brian C.; WANG Long; WANG Jiunwen; MURNIGHAN J. Keith
Contemplation and Conversation: Subtle Influences on Moral Decision Making Academy of Management Journal 55, 1 (2012) 13-33

This research investigated the role of contemplation, conversation (conceptualized as social contemplation), and explanations in right-wrong decisions. Several theories suggest that contemplation or morally-oriented conversations will promote ethical decisions and that immediate choice or self-interested conversations will not; other theories suggest that individuals’ explanations will reinforce their decisions. An experimental task tempting people to lie supported all of these predictions. In addition, truth-tellers viewed the situation as morally-oriented and non-truth-tellers viewed it as oriented around self-interest, both before and after their decisions. These findings provided the basis for a new, process model of moral decision making.
BHATTACHARYA Shantanu, KAVADIAS Stylianos
Optimal Sequential Investments in New Product Development with Emerging Technologies and Learning
INSEAD Working Paper 2011/116/TOM

We address the challenge of determining the optimal investments for a firm with limited new product development (NPD) resources, when the product development opportunities come over time from two distinct technologies. Upfront investment in a product platform gives higher returns from opportunities based on the platform technology in the future, due to the associated learning effects. Contingent on the order that technologies arise, we formulate the resource allocation problem and characterize the optimal development investments that determine the firm product development roadmap. We show that the firm should invest more resources in platform development if the returns from subsequent opportunities to leverage the platform are high, and if opportunities arise intermittently. In addition, the investment in platform development decreases in the uncertainty about either the learning effect, or the resources budget. Finally, we analyze the competitive scenario where two firms develop offerings based on the two technologies, and we show that the competing firms benefit from focusing resource investment on the competitively intense product line. Insights are then provided into the properties of the firm NPD roadmaps based on multiple technologies.
BRANNEN Mary Yoko
Using Multiple Case Studies to Generalize from Ethnographic Research in  Rethinking the Case Study in International Business and Management Research, Rebecca Piekkari, Catherine Welch (Eds.), Edward Elgar (2011) 124-125
SZULANSKI Gabriel
Sumantra's Challenge: Publish a Theory-testing Case Study in a Top Journal in  Rethinking the Case Study in International Business and Management Research, Rebecca Piekkari, Catherine Welch (Eds.), Edward Elgar (2011) 107-123


This chapter reports the highlights of a fifteen year journey during which we tested a theory with a single case study (N=1) and published the ensuing report in the Strategic Management Journal. It all began in 1990, during the exciting early days of the INSEAD Ph.D. program, in a Ph.D. seminar on Advanced Research Methods. In the end we’ve found a way to test theory with a single case study . . . and we published it in issue 27 of the Strategic Management Journal, pages 937-957, 2006. So this chapter is about the road that started in Fontainebleau, during Sumantra’s research’s method seminar, and abutted in SMJ. We’ve learned a lot, about what it means to be a scholar, about our own academic values, and especially about what it takes to test theory with a case study.

Monday, November 14, 2011


CK Prahalad Distinguished Scholar-Practitioner Award 2011

The Strategic Management Society created this award in memory of CK Prahalad. The  prize praises the excellence in the application of learning that guides how theory shapes the understanding of practice, with an emphasis on global strategic leadership.
LI Jun, NETESSINE Serguei
First Prize, 2011 Manufacturing and Service Operations Management Student paper Competition



 
GODART Frederic
Penser la mode IFM Edition & Publications (2011)

L’objectif de cet ouvrage, sans précédent en France, est de fournir un corpus pluridisciplinaire de textes sur la mode depuis l’Antiquité grecque jusqu’au XXIe siècle. Alors même que la mode est un objet auquel résiste traditionnellement la pensée occidentale, cette sélection d’extraits vise à mettre en lumière une réflexion sur la mode, voire sur des concepts limitrophes, pour faire ressortir ce qu’elle présente de plus singulier. Chacun des textes choisis, que ce soit notamment ceux de Platon, Rousseau, Veblen, Tarde, Barthes, Bourdieu, Baudrillard et plus récemment de penseurs anglo-saxons comme Fred Davis ou Diana Crane, est systématiquement présenté et accompagné d’un commentaire qui s’attache à resituer l’auteur et le problème soulevé tant dans son contexte culturel que conceptuel, tout en prenant la mesure du cheminement de la question de la mode.

BELAVINA Elena, GIROTRA Karan
Relational Advantages of Intermediation, Management Science 58, 9 (2012) 1614-1631

This paper provides a novel explanation for the use of supply chain intermediaries such as Li & Fung Ltd.. We find that even in the absence of the well-known transactional and informational advantages of mediation, intermediaries improve supply chain performance. In particular, intermediaries facilitate responsive adaptation of the buyers’ supplier base to their changing needs while simultaneously ensuring that suppliers behave as if they had long-term sourcing commitments from buying firms. In the face of changing buyer needs, an intermediary that sources on behalf of multiple buyers can responsively change the composition of future business committed to a supplier such that a sufficient level of business comes from the buyer(s) that most prefer this supplier. On the other hand, direct buyers that source only for themselves must provide all their committed business to a supplier from their own sourcing needs, even if they no longer prefer this supplier. Unlike existing theories of intermediation, our theory better explains the observed phenomenon that while transactional barriers and information asymmetries have steadily decreased, the use of intermediaries has soared, even among large companies such as Walmart.

Thursday, November 10, 2011

CORNELISSEN Gert, COJUHARENCO Irina, KARELAIA Natalia
One Person in the Battlefield is Not a Warrior: Self-Construal, Perceived Ability to Make a Difference, and Socially Responsible Behavior
INSEAD Working Paper 2011/115/DS

We suggest that cultivating an individual’s connectedness to others promotes socially responsible behavior both directly and indirectly – through increased perceived ability to make a difference. Individuals whose interdependent self is more prominent feel they have more of an impact on larger scale societal outcomes and, therefore, engage more in socially responsible behaviors than do individuals whose independent self is more prominent. We test these hypotheses in two experiments in which participants make financial contributions or exert an effort for a social cause. In a survey, we find that perceived effectiveness mediates the effect of self-construal on socially responsible consumption.
LI Jun, NETESSINE Serguei
Partnering with Competitors - An Empirical Analysis of Airline Alliances and Multimarket Competition
INSEAD Working Paper 2011/114/TOM/ACGRE revised version of 2011/24/TOM/ACGRE


Competition has become an important theme in the operations management literature and, according to recent theoretical and empirical work, the key finding is that firms tend to overstock or overproduce under competition. Following this prediction, one would expect that, after airlines start a multifaceted collaboration by forming an alliance, their networks would be consolidated and capacity redundancies would be eliminated, as intensity of competition decreases among alliance partners. Surprisingly, we find exactly the opposite: in the post-alliance era, alliance partners seek to overlap their networks more and they increase capacities on the markets in which two partners are already present. At the same time, average prices in those markets increase by about $11 per one-way segment coupon. We explain these results using predictions based on the theory of multimarket competition: as firms seek out opportunities to establish multimarket contact to strengthen mutual forbearance, they have incentives to increase overlap even though this decision may not seem optimal or efficient locally or in the short term. We examine other plausible competing mechanisms built on theories of capacity and service competition and commonly cited benefits of airline alliances but ultimately we conclude that our findings are most likely driven by the multimarket competition. This paper therefore underscores the importance of going beyond simple bilateral competition models whose predictions may not hold when firms compete operationally in multiple markets, a phenomenon which is widespread in many operations-intensive industries.

Monday, November 7, 2011

IBARRA Herminia
Shortlisted for 2011 Thinkers50 Leadership Award
2011 Ranking: #28

The ranking is based on voting at the Thinkers50 website and input from a team of advisers. Thinkers are evaluated according to  ten established criteria: originality of ideas; practicality of ideas; presentation style; written communication; loyalty of followers; business sense; international outlook; rigor of research; impact of ideas and the elusive guru factor.

Friday, November 4, 2011

HAWAWINI Gabriel
The Internationalization of Higher Education Institutions: A Critical Review and a Radical Proposal
INSEAD Working Paper 2011/112/FIN

We provide a critical review of the process called the “internationalization of higher education institutions” (HEI) with a closer look at the case of business schools. After offering an alternative definition of this phenomenon and examining the forces that drive international initiatives, we explain what we call the “internationalization paradox”: the observation that despite evidence that many of these initiatives fail to deliver what they promise, they nevertheless remain at the top of the agenda of heads of HEIs. We then develop a framework that identifies alternative models of internationalization. Based on this framework we sketch out a model of the truly global HEI whose mission is to learn from the world rather than teach the world what the institution knows. Our central thesis is that it is unlikely that HEIs will be able to transform themselves into truly global HEIs because of historical and organizational barriers rather than a shortage of resources or a lack of visionary leadership. We conclude that most HEIs should refrain from claiming that their aim is to become global institutions. They should instead focus on the successful implementation of an import-export model of internationalization that calls for initiatives such as the internationalization of the curriculum, the creation of student and faculty exchange programs, and the participation in international academic and research partnerships. Any attempt to transform themselves into truly global institutions is unlikely to succeed and may divert them from their fundamental mission to educate their home-based students and help them become effective global citizens.


HUNTER Mark, VAN WASSENHOVE Luk, BESIOU Maria
BP PLC (parts A & B)
© 2011 INSEAD Case Study
Also available: Teaching Note


The announcement that BP PLC, the world's third-largest oil firm, was going "beyond petroleum" generated scepticism from news media, indifference from investors, and outraged opposition from environmentalists in 2000. When BP's Alaska employees raised safety and environmental concerns in 2002, stakeholder groups, news media and regulators were drawn into the conflict.

Pedagogical Objectives: This case demonstrates how the dynamics of stakeholder activism and influence have changed as a consequence of the emergence of stakeholder-controlled media. These follow different rules and objectives from conventional news media, and their influence on management strategies may be decisive. Participants should gain awareness of the operating principles of these new forces, and how they impact corporate social responsibility in particular.
CHICK Stephen, ROSE Kyle Jacques
Team Type 1: Engaging People with Diabetes
© 2011 INSEAD Case Study

This case documents challenges in the growth of a NGO whose mission is to educate and inspire individuals with diabetes. Team Type 1 engages and encourages healthy lifestyles and effective control of diabetes by example. The original model is based on active participation of patients in cycling clubs, and the question of how to scale the model to broader geographies is raised.

Pedagogical Objectives:  Community wellness requires patient engagement as a mechanism for managing chronic conditions. This case provides a context for discussing one new model of patient engagement and general awareness of diabetes. The model has seen initial successes, but a mechanism for sustaining growth and development into more communities is raised for discussion.


PICH Michael
AlliedSignal Aerospace Services – Singapore: A Clear Case for Change
© 2011 INSEAD Case Study

Jacques Esculier arrives in Singapore to assume the position of Vice-President of Repair & Overhaul (R&O) for AlliedSignal Aerospace’s Asia Pacific operations. On discovering that the Managing Director of the facility in Singapore responsible for the repair and overhaul of auxiliary power units has resigned, he assumes the MD role as well. Once he has a good grasp of the key issues that the shop is facing. Jacques knows that changes must be implemented to reduce deficiencies in cycle time and quality level, as well as to solve problems of supply and inventory. As a corporate fast-tracker with an MBA he relishes the challenge.

Pedagogical Objectives: Six-Sigma is still one of the most popular business improvement practices in the world, yet most implementations still fail to achieve sustainable improvements. Most organizations adopt Six-Sigma to manage indicators instead of using it to learn how best to create value in their organizations. The AlliedSignal Aerospace Services case is a perfect example of this. It explores the specifics of Six-Sigma and lean thinking, and demonstrates the importance of the manager-as-leader in ensuring the success of such initiatives.

Thursday, November 3, 2011

SMITH N. Craig
Laying Foundations for an Emerging Field: A Commentary on Shelby Hunt’s Research on Marketing Ethics in Macromarketing, Ethics and Social Responsibility: The Research Tradition Period John R. Sparks (Ed.) (2011) 297-302